Psych M.D. - Bystander Effect


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Term: Bystander effect
Definition (Myers): The tendency for any given bystander to be less likely to give aid if other bystanders are present
Definition (alternative): is a social psychological phenomenon in which individuals are less likely to offer help in an emergency situation when other people are present. The probability of help is inversely proportional to the number of bystanders*
Contextual explanation: The term bystander effect refers to the phenomenon in which the greater the number of people present, the less likely people are to help a person in distress. When an emergency situation occurs, observers are more likely to take action if there are few or no other witnesses. In one experiment, subjects were placed in one of three treatment conditions: alone in a room, with two other participants or with two confederates who pretended to be normal participants. As the participants sat filling out questionnaires, smoke began to fill the room. When participants were alone, 75% reported the smoke to the experimenters. In contrast, just 38% of participants in a room with two other people reported the smoke. In the final group, the two confederates in the experiment noted the smoke and then ignored it, which resulted in only 10% of the participants reporting the smoke.
Psych M.D. - Bystander Effect - The Neuron
Related terms and concepts: Social Psychology
The left video shows the smoke experiment(see contextual explanation), and the right video shows the incident of Kitty Genovese.


Related websites:
The BystanderEffect
What is the Bystander Effect?
http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/bystander_effect.htm
Edited by: Julie



More pages