Psych M.D - One-word stage


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Term: one-word stage
Definition (Myers): the stage in speech development, from about age 1 to 2, during which a child speaks mostly in single words 1
Definition (alternative): During language development children go through stages during which their language gets better and better until they can finally speak fluently. The one-word stage, as the name implies, the stage in which children speak mainly in single words. For example, during the one-word stage a child isn't yet able to say "I want milk" so they say "milk". This stage occurs from about age 1-2, and then gives way to the two-word stage (seriously¬Ö it's true) 2
Contextual explanation: Although speech made by the baby like 'ma' or 'da' might be hard to understand by a stranger, the baby soon learns to talk like their family and the family learns to understand the baby. For example, if a baby says, "kitty!" Then, the baby actually means something like, "look at the kitty over there!" By babbling one word, the baby of one years old seeks to communicate a whole sentence to those around.
Related terms and concepts:
3
Related websites:
Sources:
  1. Myers, D. G. (2004). Psychology. New York: Worth Publishers.
  2. Chicago School of Professional Psychology. (n.d.). Psychology Glossary. Definitions to psychology terms written in English, not psychological jargon. Retrieved September 10, 2009, from http://www.alleydog.com/glossary/definition.cfm?term=One-Word%20Stage
  3. acarvin. (2007, July 6). YouTube - Baby Talk, Baby Babble. Retrieved September 13, 2009, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DDZbQ_OJWw
Edited by: Mike
Date of last edit: September 10, 2009



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