Psych M.D. – Theory Y




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Term: Theory Y
Definition (Myers):Theory Y assumes that, given challenge and freedom, workers are motivated to achieve self-esteem and to demonstrate their competence and creativity.
Definition (alternative):In this theory management assumes employees may be ambitious, self-motivated, and exercise self-control. It is believed that employees enjoy their mental and physical work duties. A Theory Y manager believes that, given the right conditions, most people will want to do well at work. They believe that the satisfaction of doing a good job is a strong motivation. Many people interpret Theory Y as a positive set of beliefs about workers. A close reading of The Human Side of Enterprise reveals that McGregor simply argues for managers to be open to a more positive view of workers and the possibilities that this creates.
Contextual explanation:Many corporations are starting to favor Theory Y in their practices to increase employee participation in making decisions. Currently, Japan and Sweden are the most notable places that commonly use Theory Y. Theory Y is basically the Deist idea in workplaces.
"To push decision making, planning, and strategizing from a handful of people at the top, down throughout the organization. We wanted all the employees to think every day about how to improve the company," reports CEO Jeffrey Bleustein. Think about about why Jeffrey Bleustein said that. He said it because he trusted his workers, and believed his workers are intrinsically motivated enough to push decisions and make plans for his company.
Related terms and concepts:
Industrial-organizational(I/O) Psychology
Theory X
Intrinsic Motivation
Motivation
Psych M.D. – Theory Y - The Neuron
Picture from: http://www.bized.co.uk/images/meeting1.jpg
Related websites:
http://accel-team.com/human_relations/hrels_03_mcgregor.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_X_and_theory_Y#Theory_Y
http://www.netmba.com/mgmt/ob/motivation/mcgregor/
Edited by:Joon