Psych M.D. - Sensory Memory


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Term: Sensory Memory
Definition (Myers): The immediate, initial recording of sensory information in the memory system.₁
Definition (alternative): The first level of memory that retains the brief impression of a sensory stimulus after the stimulus itself has ended.₂
Contextual explanation:

Sensory memory is a part of the three-stage processing of memory. This model was proposed by Richard Atkinson and Richard Shiffrin. It basically suggests that we create memory in three stages: sensory memory, short-term memory, and long-term memory.

Sensory memory is the first stage; the stage that we first record the sensory information that we received.
It is a very short-term memory where senses store what they have just received before any cognitive processing may occur.

This type of memory slips away comparatively quickly. An example may be when we are in a crowded room and hear a multiple numbers of people surrounding you talking about different subjects and picking up a few unconsciously. You may be surprised that you do actually recall some of these conversations soon after.

Related terms and concepts:



Psych M.D. - Sensory Memory - The Neuron

Psych M.D. - Sensory Memory - The Neuron


Related websites:
Sources:
  1. Myers, D.G. (2003). Psychology. New York City: Worth Publishers.
  2. (n.d.). Cognitive processes. Retrieved from http://library.thinkquest.org/26618/en-5.2.2=sensory%20memory.htm
  3. (2007, December 14). [Video Podcast]. Change Player Size Watch this video in a new window Multi Sensory Memory Processing. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ls0LNCrRTTg
  4. Patrick, R. (2002). The Brain from top to bottom. Retrieved from http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/d/d_07/d_07_p/d_07_p_tra/d_07_p_tra.html
  5. (n.d.). How does Human memory work?. Retrieved from http://www.mindfiesta.com/how-does-human-memory-work-1
Edited by: Kathy
Date of last edit: November 5, 2009



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