Psych M.D. - Storage


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Term: Storage
Definition (Myers): Retaining information (part of the process of remembering) 1
Definition (alternative): Memory is stored by means of three memory systems: sensory memory, short-term memory, and long-term memory. 2
Contextual explanation: To store information into your memory, it requires encoding (input), storing (retain), and retrieval (output). From these three processes, storage is where you drill the information into your brain/memory. There are three-stages to storage: sensory memory, short-term memory, and long-term memory. Sensory memory is the initial recording of sensory information in the memory system. There are two types of sensory memory: iconic memory and echoic memory. Both only record the information for a split second, then the information fleets away. Iconic memory is a momentary photographic memory. If three rows of three letters were flashed before your eyes for only .05 seconds, your brain receives all the information. However, all that data you received fleets in an instant. Echoic memory is the same as iconic memory except it deals with hearing, rather than seeing. Short-term memory is limited in time and space, meaning you information stored in your short-term memory can't last long and your memory can't hold a lot of information. Short-term memory is where unrehearsed information is stored. These memories are lost in approximately 20 to 30 seconds. The information moves from sensory memory to short-term memory after more encoding. Then after another process of encoding, you reach the long-term memory stage where information stored can be limitless and almost permanent. There are two categories in long-term memory: explicit memory and implicit memory. Implicit memory is information you can recall without conscious recall, such as skills and classical and operant conditioned effects. Explicit memory is recalling that requires conscious recall, like facts, general knowledge, and personal experiences. Last thing you need to know is that these explicit memories are activated in the hippocampus, while implicit memory is activated in the amygdala and cerebellum. 1
Related terms and concepts: insert links to other pages on The Neuron here
Three Stages of Memory3
http://198.45.22.27/connectext/psy/ch07/stages.mhtml

Long-term Memory4
http://www.aboutmind.com/memory-brain-neurons-1.shtml

Hippocampus5
http://brainconnection.positscience.com/topics/?main=gal/hippocampus

Cerebellum6
http://bungelab.berkeley.edu/KidsCorner/kidscorner/glossary.html
Related websites: insert links to external websites here
Sources: insert WAPA style citations here
  1. Myers, D. G. (2004). Psychology. New York, New York: Worth Publishers.
  2. Wiley, Initials. (2009). Psychology: Memory Storage. Cliffnotes. Retrieved (2009, December 10) from http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/CliffsReviewTopic/Memory-Storage.topicArticleId-25438,articleId-25419.html
  3. McGrawHill, Initials. (2009). Three stages of memory. Retrieved from http://198.45.22.27/connectext/psy/ch07/stages.mhtml
  4. Rhawn, Joseph. (2001). Memory, brain, neurons. Retrieved from http://www.aboutmind.com/memory-brain-neurons-1.shtml
  5. Hippocampus. (2009, December). Retrieved from http://brainconnection.positscience.com/topics/?main=gal/hippocampus
  6. Brain glossary. (2005). Retrieved from http://bungelab.berkeley.edu/KidsCorner/kidscorner/glossary.html
Edited by: Elaine
Date of last edit: 12/10/09



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