Psych M.D. - classical conditioning

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Term: Classical Conditioning
Definition (Myers): A type of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli
Definition (alternative): a form of associative learning that was firstly demonstrated by Ivan Pavlov. The typical procedure for inducing classical conditioning involves presentations of a neutral stimulus along with a stimulus of some significance. The neutral stimulus could be any event that does not result in an overt behavioral response from the organism under investigation. Pavlov referred to this as a Conditioned Stimulus (CS). Conversely, presentation of the significant stimulus necessarily evokes an innate, often reflexive, response. Pavlov called these the Unconditioned Stimulus (US) and Unconditioned Response (UR), respectively. If the CS and the US are repeatedly paired, eventually the two stimuli become associated and the organism begins to produce a behavioral response to the CS. Pavlov called this the Conditioned Response (CR). link to site
Contextual explanation: Normally when a bell is rang, a dog will not salivate. However, we can make them salivate by using the method of classical conditioning. To make the dos salivate normally, we just have to place some food in front of them. When bell is rang before the food is put in front of the dogs, soon the dogs will think wehn the bell rings, that food is going to be placed, which will make them salivate. Conditioning things by making dogs think that something will happen after something is called Classical Conditioning.
Related terms and concepts: CS, CR, US, UR, NS

Classical Conditioning - The Neuron

Related websites: An Introduction to Classical Conditioning, Learning Theories, Conditioning
Edited by: John Lee

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