Psych M.D.- Spacing Effect


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Term: Spacing Effect
Definition (Myers): The tendency for distributed study or practice to yield better long-term retention than is achieved through massed study or practice. 1
Definition (alternative): A fact about repetition of an item is that successive repetitions affect memory less than do repetitions that are spaced apart in time. 2
Contextual explanation: Spacing effect states that repetition of an experience farther apart in time will have greater effect in improving memory than repetition close together in time. Since we are students I will put this in our Basically, if a student has an exam coming up, cramming the information the night before is not likely to be as efficient as studying at intervals in a longer span of time. The principle also states that repetition is more effective when a person is on the verge of forgetting. People tested this out by memorizing foreign words in both long and short span with repetitions. 4
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Sources: insert WAPA style citations here
  1. Myers, D. G. (2004). Psychology. New York, New York: Worth Publishers.
  2. Dewey Russ (2007). The Spacing Effect. www.psywww.com. Retrieved (2009, September 13) from http://www.psywww.com/intropsych/ch06_memory/spacing_effect.html
  3. No name (2009). We forget more easily than we remember. Retenda. Retrieved (2009, September 13) from http://www.retenda.com/site/spaced-learning/
  4. Sisti Helene (2009). Neurogenesis and the spacing effect Learning over time enhances memory and the survival of new neurons. Learnmem. Retrieved (2009, September 13) from http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/14/5/368.abstract
Edited by: Elaine
Date of last edit: 9/13/09



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