Psych. M.D.-Endorphins

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Term: Endorphins
Definition (Myers): "morphine within" - natural, opiate-like neurotransmitters linked to pain controls and to pleasure. [1]
Definition (alternative): Endorphins are produced by the pituitary gland and hypothalamus during a state of excessive stress or exciThey are produced by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus in vertebrates during strenuous exercise, excitement, pain and orgasm and they resemble the opiates in their abilities to produce analgesia and a sense of well-being. Endorphins work as "natural pain relievers", whose effects may be enhanced by other medications. [2]

Contextual explanation: Humanity's very first pain killer morphine, the painkiller extracted out from a plant called Opium. During the wars, it alleviated the pain of thousands of injured soldiers. It also saved a lot of people from diarrhea, dysentery, cholera and other diseases. Opium definitely had a powerful effect BUT there were deadly side effects and addiction. Although there were many side effects many people still had to depend their lives on opium. However, on 1975, a pharmacologist named Kosteritz found this substance that had a pain killing effect that was 300times better than morphine. There was no addiction, and it didn't cost money AT ALL. This substance was available for everyone. Yes, it was the endorphin that was inside everyone's body, the best pain killer ever. When there's pain, or even during an aerobic exercise endorphins are released, and you are able to forget your pain. In fact, instead of pain, you experience excitement. This is what you keep on moving forward. Endorphins are not release when you are happy, but during a serious stress or excessive physical pain, to alleviate that pain, endorphins are released.

One more fact,
the moment when greatest amount of endorphins are released is right before death.

Related terms and concepts: insert links to other pages on The Neuron here
Brain Endorphin

Cartoon Endorphin
Related websites: insert links to external websites here
Sources: insert WAPA style citations here
  1. Myers, D (2004). Psychology. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.
  2. Endorphins. (n.d.). Retrieved 2008-10-15., from Wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endorphin
  3. Benjamin W. Van Voorhee(2007). Exercise glossary. Chicago, IL: http://www.clarian.org/ADAM/doc/OrthopedicsCenter/28/000316.htm
  4. Ashikkerib (2007). Retrieved 2007-12-26. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWcfTGIU2Hs&feature=related
  5. Doug, S (2008). Savage chicken. http://betterifyouwant.wordpress.com/2009/04/06/endorphins-and-exercising/
Edited by: Erica
Date of last edit: September 10, 2009



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